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WELCOME

 
 

TO THE POLLINATOR GALLERY GUIDE

 

For PARK[ING] DAY 2019, LAB is partnering with The DC Department of Energy & Environment and The U.S. National Arboretum to present THE POLLINATOR GALLERY - an issue-focused installation that highlights the important role that pollinators play in our natural and designed landscapes both here in the District and around the world.

Use this guide as you wander through our installation to learn more about the information represented in our Park(ing) Day space, the important work that we and our partners are doing to support and create pollinator habitat, AND tips and tricks to become your best pollinator activist self.

Most importantly: Share this page far and wide! We intend this to be a resource that lasts beyond the physical installation.


WHAT DO BEES SEE?

BEES SEE ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT!

 
Source: Bee Culture

Source: Bee Culture

 
 

WHAT we see

Coreopsis verticillata  ‘Moonbeam’

Coreopsis verticillata ‘Moonbeam’

Rudbeckia hirta

Rudbeckia hirta

Symphyotrichum novae-angliae

Symphyotrichum novae-angliae

Echinacea purpurea

Echinacea purpurea

WHAT BEES see

Coreopsis verticillata  ‘Moonbeam’

Coreopsis verticillata ‘Moonbeam’

Rudbeckia hirta

Rudbeckia hirta

Symphyotrichum novae-angliae

Symphyotrichum novae-angliae

Echinacea purpurea

Echinacea purpurea

 

WHERE DO BEES LIVE?

ABOUT 70% OF NATIVE BEES ARE GROUND NESTING.

 
Schizachyrium scoparium

Schizachyrium scoparium

Panicum virgatum

Panicum virgatum

 
 

Even though grasses don’t provide nectar, they are just as important in pollinator gardens as beautiful perennials & wildflowers. Bunch grasses provide nesting sites for bumble bees by providing access to the soil between the base of each grass clump.

 
 

WHY POLLINATORS?

 

IN THE LAST 27 YEARS, there has been A +75% decline in total flying insect biomass in protected areas.

 
 
SOURCE: PLOS

SOURCE: PLOS

SOURCE: PLOS

SOURCE: PLOS

 
 

The graph on the left illustrates the significant decrease in insect biomass in the last 30 years. On the right, the graph shows both the decrease over time and the peak in insect biomass in mid-summer (June, July, and August).

 
 

WHAT’S IN the POLLINATOR GALLERY?

LAB PARK[ING] DAY 2019 COMPONENTS

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A SPATIAL visualization OF BEE VISION,

POLLINATOR HABITAT, & INSECT BIOMASS DECLINE

 
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HOW DOES LAB INTEGRATE POLLINATORS?

THROUGH OUR PROJECTS & PARTNERS!

The Access Road Ecotones project is a 1.5 mile long infrastructure project that represents LAB’s largest effort to-date to bring pollinator needs to the forefront of the designed landscape. While the Access Road project is certainly our largest pollinator-focused effort to-date, we integrate pollinator-focused plant design in jobs big and small, public and private, residential and commercial.

In the Access Road project, Planted areas articulate a transition from the typical streetscapes at the edges of the project to more intensified woodland planting where users come into more direct contact with Shepherd parkway. Stormwater management was a significant driver of the design and included a series of linear LID tree planters that span the length of the project as well as several large retention basins in the interchange area. 

As part of the design process, LAB worked with the Xerces Society, a non-profit organization dedicated to protecting insects and their habitats, in order to enhance the project’s ecological performance with a particular focus on improving insect pollinator habitat.  The research associated with this project remains in development and has been made publicly available in an effort to help landscape architects and allied professionals contribute to this important effort.

The Access Road Ecotones project has been the recipient of several local awards and was presented at the ICOET conference in 2017.

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HOW CAN YOU HELP?

KNOW YOUR NATIVES.

(AND NON-NATIVE, NON-AGGRESSIVES.)

There are so many wonderful resources out there! We have gathered a couple of our favorites here for easy access - they include native and pollinator-focused plant lists as well as a protection plans for pollinators that have additional tips and trick. The resources on this list are geared toward DC and the Mid-Atlantic region, but there are many more for other areas of the country and the world!

Source: DC Department of Energy & the Environment

Source: DC Department of Energy & the Environment

Source: Xerces Society

Source: Xerces Society


 
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